Maintenance and Cleaning: If you use steamed milk, I highly suggest changing the setting to display the "Rinse Milk System" prompt to appear right after using. The default is 10 minutes, and you cannot select this rinse from the Maintenance menu. The quicker you rinse out the milk residue, the less likely you are to get clogs. The manual also suggests to use the Jura Cappuccino Cleaner daily. I tend to rinse often and do a breakdown cleaning of the milk system and frother about every other day.
It’s affordable (£70 at Argos at the time of writing; Dolce Gusto pods are priced at around £4 for a box of 16) and incredibly simple to set up and use. Simply fill the removable water tank with cold H2O, pop your chosen coffee pod into a slide-out drawer at the front, stick a cup under the spout and hit the power button. When it turns from red to green (a mere few seconds) the machine is ready. You then push the water lever either left (for cold drinks) or right (for hot drinks) until the desired amount of your drink is in the cup. Then slide out the drawer, expel the pod and throw it away.
Best of all, thanks to a thermal coffee pot, if you don't polish off the whole pot right away, it will still stay piping hot hours after it was brewed. For $130, the MT600 from Capresso offers all these abilities plus is wrapped up into a snazzy brushed-metal-and-black-plastic frame. Sure, the MT600 won't deliver a truly sublime cup of drip-brewed coffee. For that there's no getting around splurging at least $200 and up for a more capable machine.

Jura Capresso was born in 1994 as a company that aimed to deliver high-end European style coffeemakers to the American market. Eight years later, it entered into a joint venture agreement with Jura AG, a Swiss developer and distributor of automatic coffee centers that is present in more than 50 countries. By 2008, Jura AG had become the sole owner of all Jura Capresso operations.


Though there are fewer complaints about the frother falling off with the Jura Capresso Impressa J5 than other Jura Capresso Impressa machines, it still seems to be a problem. Some owners replace the frother with another type. It received five stars on amazon.com due to a couple of reviewers unhappy that the machine arrived and didn’t work right out of the box.
After extensive researching of current high(er) end coffee machines, I purchased the Jura C65 to replace my Jura F7 - which had finally failed after 11 years of reliable service. Set-up was fast and easy -- instruction booklet is well organized with useful diagrams. Am completing the 1st week of daily use: so far so good. The C65 produces excellent coffee. Controls are less complicated than my old F7, and it is easy to adjust to fit individual tastes -- strength, cup size, temperature, etc. Only fret is reliability -- will it match the duration of the F7?
As with other Jura machines, the Impressa Z6 is hygienic and conveniently cleans up after itself. The extra large 2.4 L water tank has a handle for easy removing, and is designed to work with a Smart Water Filter, which uses RFID technology to communicate with the control panel about its lifespan, automatically alerting you when it needs changing. Using a filter ensures great tasting coffee and reduces the need for descaling. The Impressa Z6 automatically rinses on start up, and keeps a reminder to clean the milk circuit on-screen when needed. All of the maintenance processes, such as brew group cleaning and descaling, will throw alerts as well, and are easily accessed through the TFT display where they can be performed by pressing a button. Step up to the Giga 5 for a dual grinder, dual boiler machine for high speed brewing and added functionality; or for a smaller machine you can control with your smartphone, take a look at the intuitive, ultra-convenient J6.

It would be a mistake to say that there’s no learning curve at all on the E8.  It has one; it’s just not particularly steep.  Sure, there are a lot of settings, and a lot of things you can change, tweak and adjust, but honestly, the hardest part of its operation is going to be changing your preferred drink settings and familiarizing yourself with the way the menus work.
Along with premium engineering, Capresso products are designed with high-end aesthetics in mind. Clean black trims, aesthetic curves, and clean stainless steel finishes are all common branding traits. Capresso products are also notably ergonomic, featuring comfortable handles, easily visible and extruded controls, and a notable lack of rough edges. With design awards to back it up, Capresso produces beautiful, innovative, and powerful coffee equipment.
The Saeco PicoBaristo HD8924/47 Super-automatic espresso machine is a superior compact coffee machine from one of the world’s best-known manufacturers. It is an Amazon Choice machine, popular with purchasers and the recipient of excellent reviews. The PicoBaristo provides the widest variety of drinks of any compact super-automatic espresso machine.
After extensive researching of current high(er) end coffee machines, I purchased the Jura C65 to replace my Jura F7 - which had finally failed after 11 years of reliable service. Set-up was fast and easy -- instruction booklet is well organized with useful diagrams. Am completing the 1st week of daily use: so far so good. The C65 produces excellent coffee. Controls are less complicated than my old F7, and it is easy to adjust to fit individual tastes -- strength, cup size, temperature, etc. Only fret is reliability -- will it match the duration of the F7?
The Jura-Capresso S8 is a luxurious coffee and espresso machine with a long list of benefits and only a few detractors. The price would be the biggest obstacle for most consumers, and while those with pure coffee tastes may demure at the price tag, coffee connoisseurs who patronize the typical overpriced chain coffee shops could justify the expense. The bottom line is that one cannot fail to make perfect cafe-style drinks with the sexy, state-of-the-art S8 machine.
The Gaggia Brera is a great budget super automatic espresso machine that not only has a small form factor, but it’s also very well designed and looks great on any kitchen countertop. When thinking about it, the first thing that comes to the mind of those that already use it is convenience. For example, the water tank, drop tray and the dregs drawer are all within reach and can be easily accessed from the machine for simple, swift maintenance and regular cleaning.
Jura Giga 5: Setting new standards in performance and aesthetics, the Giga 5 features two ceramic disc grinders, 2.6-liter water tank, a monitored drip tray, two heating systems, a variable brewing chamber, height-adjustable coffee spout and an Intelligent Pre-Brew Aroma system that allows the coffee aroma to fully develop. It’s professional technology that lets you brew an unprecedented range of drinks in the comfort of your own home.

Jura designates a new line of coffee machines whenever a major technological breakthrough is achieved. We will review these technologies in-depth in the following section, and provide more specs when we cover each individual machine. If you see a term that you don’t immediately understand, don’t worry, just reference the glossary in the next section!

One downside of the C65 is that it isn’t self-cleaning. If you don’t mind taking it apart and rinsing everything out manually, then that shouldn’t be an issue. However, as James mentioned, sometimes the bean holder will think that it’s empty when there are still grounds inside. Overall, it is a minor inconvenience, but it can be frustrating when you’re running late in the morning, and you get a smaller cup as a result.


As an anecdote, I once failed one of my shots, it happens to everyone. The biggest problem with that cup was that it had almost no crema. I sipped it anyway, I wanted to see how it was. I was absolutely stunned by the taste of that shot. The unique combination of tamping and grind size made that cup more flavorful. It just didn’t have enough crema. Never judge an espresso by its looks. This is why some people hate Nespresso with a passion, it is very consistent, and it gives you a great shot with ample crema every time, but it is never fantastic. I love “fantastic”, but for the convenience, I settle for good, so Nespresso is one of my favorite coffeemakers. If convenience is what you are looking for mostly, take a look at our article that compares capsule-based espresso machines.

The improvements are quite a few, including the four selectable strength options that helps determine the dosage of the shots you want to brew between five and sixteen grams of coffee. If you want, you can easily tailor your experience with programmable pre-brewing, brew temperature and water volume. You can make the adjustments by using the rotary switch and the good news is that the machine will remember your preferences so you can brew the same delicious cup of coffee next time.

To that end, the MT600 will attempt to keep track of when you last dropped in a fresh charcoal pack. Just press the "filter" button on the control panel, and after six weeks an associated green light will begin blinking. If you unplug the machine, however, all bets are off, as the clock and internal filter replacement timer lose track when power is lost.
My daughter and her husband thought this was a great product. He likes his coffe real strong so can adjust it to his taste. She likes tea so the steamer is great for her. (I hear she is getting back into the cappacionos!) Also with dual spigots on the machine he can make 2 cups at a time for him and his best buddy in the early AM. I have'nt tried it yet, but when I do I'll give a report on it. This machine runs around $1200 new, I bought it refurbished for $400. Heck of a deal!
It makes maintenance much easier (once you’ve learned all of the elements), and it ensures that your machine will last a long time.Secondly, the quality of the grinder is superb, and we love the way that it dispenses a variety of coffees. In the end, the E6 is perfect for all coffee connoisseurs, and it will enhance your enjoyment of these beverages.
Jura designates a new line of coffee machines whenever a major technological breakthrough is achieved. We will review these technologies in-depth in the following section, and provide more specs when we cover each individual machine. If you see a term that you don’t immediately understand, don’t worry, just reference the glossary in the next section!

As we continue on our journey of Jura Coffee Makers, the Impressa C65 is another “standard” unit. It doesn’t have all of the accouterments of higher-end models, but it still makes an incredible cup of coffee, and it offers the speed and convenience that you would expect from Jura. Overall, we would compare this model to the ENA 9 above, although this one can make two cups at once.
The first machine I received never worked correctly. The milk would not steam and the espresso would start to come out and then stop. Upon stopping a message would display on the screen asking to press a button to fill the pump. This would occur 2-3 times before an expresso could actually be made. I experimented with several different grind settings, coffee strength, water temperatures, etc, but with no success. The machine continued to pump a few drops of espresso, asking to refill the pump, and waste the previous grinds. I literally wasted 2-3 cans of Illy espresso without ever getting espresso. In addition, with each espresso cycle, a large amount of water would precede any espresso. For example on a 1oz shot, about 0.1oz would be water that didn't run through the coffee.
The ENO Micro is one of the latest offerings from Jura that signals their move toward more compact units that consume less real estate in the kitchen. In fact, this particular unit is actually shorter than the older compact ENA line by a few inches. We love its small size and low profile, and find that its unassuming presence adds to the impact when the coffee start being made. Some users actually prefer the larger Jura units, but we prefer the Micro 9’s size and simplicity. The Jura ENA Micro 9 is the world’s smallest one-touch cappuccino maker but that certainly does not mean that they skimped on features or design elements.

Of course, this is not all and you get a wide range of other impressive functions, such as ceramic valve technology, pre-ground option for decaf, 1-touch cappuccino system, large bean hopper with sensor and adjustable height brew spouts. Therefore, if you’re looking for the ultimate in espresso machines, then you certainly need to consider the Jura XS90 and experience how the perfect espresso shot actually tastes like.
After much research and agonizing indecesion, I finally purchased the Jura J9 Super Automatic coffee machine. Our DeLonghi lasted several years, then died a noisy death. We had enjoyed it, but I felt like there were better machines to be had, so I focused on Jura and Saeco. I decided I wanted a Jura because of the easier cleaning, as reported by some reviewers, as well as great flavor and crema in the coffee. Then picking the model became hard. Not a lot of info on the Jura website as to how the different models work, but I finally decided that I liked the price range and capabilities of the J models. Costco had a J80 to sell, as well as a F7. I love the confidence I can have when buying from Costco, and that would have been a big plus for me. The J80 had been on sale for $400 off a few days before our DeLonghi failed, so I missed the sale and I couldn't bring myself to pay their full price of $2400 for a model that was not listed on the Jura website and some people suggested was an older model. I even emailed Costco, hoping they might honor the sale price, but no go. I finally found a J9 on Amazon for $2000, and read reviews where purchasers reassured me that, if something went wrong, I could feel secure in knowing that Amazon and its sellers would take good care of me and fix or replace the machine fairly quickly. I couldn't tell from the description if this was a J9 or J9.3, but decided it didn't matter. The model I received was the J9.3. It came quickly and the box was in great shape.
I also hate my Jura-Capresso coffee machines. Not only do they cost a wad of money, the insides cannot be end-user cleaned or serviced. The O rings in the brew mechanism go out after a few years and bring everything to a noisy grinding halt. Plus, the machine makes almost-hot enough coffee... 15 seconds in the microwave and it's hot, but sometimes makes the coffee bitter. I deduct one star for these gripes and now we're at three stars.
Any coffee-based beverage is only going to be as enjoyable as the beans that are used to make it. If you don’t already, you will need to source high-quality, whole coffee beans and drink enough coffee to make sure that those beans aren’t going stale. You can use any beans that you like, but small batch and single-origin coffee beans are going to make a world of difference over bulk and mass-produced coffee beans.
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