And that’s it. There’s very little in the way of cleaning or maintenance to be done, bar an occasional emptying of the drip tray, an occasional rinsing of the removable pod holder and, of course, the refilling of the water tank. The tank isn’t huge (0.8l), so you’ll need to do the latter fairly frequently. The drip tray, for its part, is adjustable – you can place it at one of three heights to suit the size of drinking vessel and reduce the chance of spillage.
Also, we went through a brief episode in which it would refuse to brew anything (as if it didn't have the power to punch the water through the puck of coffee). I remedied this with a descaling cycle as well as wiping out the parts above the removable tray thoroughly. (I use filtered water in the machine, but the descaling seems to be a more serious cleaning than the normal automatic cleaning.)
It would be a mistake to say that there’s no learning curve at all on the E8.  It has one; it’s just not particularly steep.  Sure, there are a lot of settings, and a lot of things you can change, tweak and adjust, but honestly, the hardest part of its operation is going to be changing your preferred drink settings and familiarizing yourself with the way the menus work.
I bought this for my wife and I admit that I thought it is crazy to spend this amount of cash on a glorified coffee pot. She already had a nice Breville expresso maker but didn't use it. Basically it was too hard to operate and clean. This machine is almost totally hands free. Push a button and get a coffee. Push a button and get a latte. At the end of the day turn it off and it rinses tiself. You only have to dump the grounds and clean the trays. I can't comment on reliability or durability but it makes awesome coffee. It is an extravagance but it you love expresso or latte and don't like hassle it is well worth the price.
Jura has several coffee machines on the market at several different price points so if you were planning on investing in one (and they are an investment), we’d like to help you make sense of the different features and make clear what you gain and lose as you look at different models while deciding which one is the best fit for your kitchen. In this thorough Jura review guide, we are going to cover what makes the Jura so special and ultimately worth the money, what the best features of each unit are, what to look out for when deciding on a model, and most importantly which Jura coffee machine to buy.
Depending on how often you use your Jura, the machine will prompt you to clean it at regular intervals. For most models this is every 180 cups of coffee. It’s important not to ignore these prompts simply because the longer you wait, the more buildup from the coffee and its oils there will be, and the more the flavor of your coffee will be affected. As with all functions of the Jura, cleaning is extremely simple and is completely hands off.

The Jura Capresso Impressa C5 is among the more affordable of the coffee centers from Jura. It is an economical choice for a durable, automatic machine that makes excellent coffee house beverages and cleans up quickly. When you have your espresso machine, you don’t have to worry about getting dressed and standing in line to enjoy delicious cafe coffees.


Maintenance and Cleaning: If you use steamed milk, I highly suggest changing the setting to display the "Rinse Milk System" prompt to appear right after using. The default is 10 minutes, and you cannot select this rinse from the Maintenance menu. The quicker you rinse out the milk residue, the less likely you are to get clogs. The manual also suggests to use the Jura Cappuccino Cleaner daily. I tend to rinse often and do a breakdown cleaning of the milk system and frother about every other day.
You can also make milky or foamed coffees, thanks to a tube that can be placed in a milk jug (or Panasonic’s own optional “Milktank” accessory). Or just have the machine squirt out hot water for tea-making. You can also tweak the amount of coffee, water and milk, and the temperature before a drink is made, and save up to four of these combinations on the machine as personal favourites.
When the milk is finally steamed on the dual element system, the machine is ready to continue making more espresso shots. Keep in mind that if you choose to get a single element machine, you’ll need to wait five minutes so that the boiler can cool off naturally and then run hot water through the steam wand for ten seconds in order to purge the boiler of steam.
It might seem like a trivial point, but not all machines have thought about this. The Jura’s power cable emerges at the bottom of the rear of the machine, making it very easy to plug it in and neatly arrange any excess cable out of sight. There’s also a ‘master’ power switch in the same location – worth noting as we discovered, having thought the machine was dead on arrival after pressing the power button on top and nothing happening!
As a home barista, you need to master all the above techniques to get the right espresso. If you make a little mistake you compromise your shot. As a result, you’ll get an average shot. Even if you know what it takes to get your shot right, there is very little room for error. Failed shots are pretty common with beginner baristas. You probably noticed in coffee shops that the shot differs from barista to barista.
Have used a SAECO machine for the last ten years.Finally "blew up" and I needed a replacement. Have known the Jura machines for a long time but because of the price never considered purchasing one. Finally had the courage to purchase the Jura J9 and have absolutely no regrets. Makes excellent Espresso or a coffee with a crema. Cappuccinos or Latte Macchiatos are a breeze to make. Wish I would have purchased earlier.
Of course, this is not all and you get a wide range of other impressive functions, such as ceramic valve technology, pre-ground option for decaf, 1-touch cappuccino system, large bean hopper with sensor and adjustable height brew spouts. Therefore, if you’re looking for the ultimate in espresso machines, then you certainly need to consider the Jura XS90 and experience how the perfect espresso shot actually tastes like.
From the outside, the Giga 5 looks attractive. It has a color TFT (thin film transistor) LCD screen display on the top front and center, with a stylish aluminum chassis with black plastic sides. This unit will definitely enhance the look of any kitchen. There’s a dedicated hot water spout at the front of the machine plus a couple of adjustable spouts for making coffee. Located on top of the unit you will find on/off buttons, a program button, and a rotary switch that is key to navigating the Giga’s menu.
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