The IMPRESSA C65 is a true workhorse when it comes to delivering amazing coffee and espresso drinks. Many reviewers have reported this model holding up for years in high-traffic environments where the machine is producing drinks throughout the day. Like all Jura coffee machines, the C65 is as simple as turning it on, selecting your drink, and having it ready to consume in under a minute. The simple and compact design of the IMPRESSA 65, coupled with its refined accents of matte and gloss make this unit memorable yet understated and perfect for any kitchen.

The other reviews comment on the burr grinder sticking and this may be as a result of using oily beans. This problem is addressed in the manual; they offer recommendations on how to get the oils to evaporate somewhat to prevent issues with the machine. The beans I use are not particularly oily and I have never had a problem with the grinder nor any problems with any of the other functions with this machine. This unit has already paid for itself several times over in savings over what I would pay at any coffee house; very pleased with this purchase!
While all of the brand’s machines take up substantial counter space, you can get all of the advanced features without taking over your kitchen. The Impressa F8 is designed as a two-cup coffee maker - it has dual nozzles in the front so that you can make them side by side. However, you can also use the spouts for perfectly frothed milk instead. So, if you’re looking for a high-quality cappuccino, you will get it without having to do anything extra.
You can also make milky or foamed coffees, thanks to a tube that can be placed in a milk jug (or Panasonic’s own optional “Milktank” accessory). Or just have the machine squirt out hot water for tea-making. You can also tweak the amount of coffee, water and milk, and the temperature before a drink is made, and save up to four of these combinations on the machine as personal favourites.
1) After much research, I purchased the F9 at Williams Sonoma, primarily because they used to have a policy that you could return anything, at any time, if needed. So, I figured that if ever I had an issue, I could just return it to my local Williams Sonoma and get a replacement rather than returning the machine to the factory and waiting. Turns out I did indeed have to do this once for an electrical issue, which was actually an issue I had with the wiring at the outlet--not the machine afterall! In any event, I don't think Williams Sonoma still has that same open-ended return policy. Be sure to research the return policy wherever you make your purchase!
Flipping open the tank lid reveals a plastic wand that houses a charcoal water filter pod (one is provided in the box). The filter setup sits within a special receptacle on the tank's interior left side. According to Capresso, the gadget will remove up to 82 percent of "the chlorine and other impurities found in tap water, and will do so for about six weeks, assuming you make one pot (10 cups) daily. It's a nice option to have, especially if you live in an area with substandard water, although remembering to swap in a new filter can be a drag.
And it bears out in the coffee the machine produces: our very first cup was a delicious and gloriously smooth latte with barely a hint of bitterness. The milk steaming wand is excellent too, producing much lighter, airier foam than the (admittedly way, way cheaper) Morphy Richards’ model, and there’s also a hot water spout for those who want to make an Americano by topping up their espresso.
And it bears out in the coffee the machine produces: our very first cup was a delicious and gloriously smooth latte with barely a hint of bitterness. The milk steaming wand is excellent too, producing much lighter, airier foam than the (admittedly way, way cheaper) Morphy Richards’ model, and there’s also a hot water spout for those who want to make an Americano by topping up their espresso.
Capresso offers a significant list of help resources that include comparison charts, instruction booklets, quick-reference guides and a list of FAQs. In addition, the company offers information on its warranties and product registration. You can contact Capresso using its toll-free customer service hotline. The nice thing about this company's customer service is that there are people available to answer your questions on Saturdays.

Jura has several coffee machines on the market at several different price points so if you were planning on investing in one (and they are an investment), we’d like to help you make sense of the different features and make clear what you gain and lose as you look at different models while deciding which one is the best fit for your kitchen. In this thorough Jura review guide, we are going to cover what makes the Jura so special and ultimately worth the money, what the best features of each unit are, what to look out for when deciding on a model, and most importantly which Jura coffee machine to buy.
One downside of the C65 is that it isn’t self-cleaning. If you don’t mind taking it apart and rinsing everything out manually, then that shouldn’t be an issue. However, as James mentioned, sometimes the bean holder will think that it’s empty when there are still grounds inside. Overall, it is a minor inconvenience, but it can be frustrating when you’re running late in the morning, and you get a smaller cup as a result.
This super-automatic Jura Capresso ENA 5 coffee machine does produce a tasty cup of coffee, no doubt about it. But we are concerned about its ability to hold up under pressure (literally, with flying milk nozzles!). For the kind of cash that this machine requires, most customers would likely be happier with another Jura model (the S9, perhaps) or another brand of super-automatic coffee machine.
×