I am a die-hard espresso fan. I love every form of the drink from straight espresso shots to lattes and cappuccinos. I currently use a Breville BES870XL Barista, it is an awesome machine. BUT, my dream machine is definitely an Italian Quickmill Andreja. Those bad boys make badass espresso. I love answering your questions, leave a comment or question below!
These machines and their respective technologies will serve you well, no matter what it is you are looking for. Keep in mind that with all their features and functionality, more expensive machines are almost always going to fall on the side of excessive for casual users. Because of this and their high cost, you may want to pick a few features that stand out to you and forgo the unnecessary frills.
The other thing to keep in mind is that the milk frother can be a little finicky. We discussed the fact that most frothers don’t (or can’t) heat the milk to the same level as the coffee, and this machine is no different. Also, cleaning the spout can be a little tricky. Overall, when buying the E6, just plan on spending some time to get to know it. Once you’ve mastered all of the little things, it will become second nature.

Combining an elegant choice of colors, understated design, the latest technology and solid, proven quality, the Impressa C65 is a unique espresso machine with powerful and intelligent features that will surprise even the most demanding coffee connoisseurs. The C65 features an Aroma Plus grinder that is now 2x as fast, yet still able to preserve the aroma of the fresh beans for a delicious tasting cup of coffee.
First of all, the TFT display will notify you when you are running low on anything (which the F8 lacks), and it will tell you when it needs cleaning. Having this kind of automatic reminders ensures that you can extend the lifespan of your machine. The other thing that we like about the E6 better than the F8 is the grinder. The G3 grinder system is a significant improvement.
You don’t even have to deal with the coffee grounds right away: they just drop into a little box that needs periodic emptying. Like the the 1.4l water tank, this box slides out of the front of the machine, which means you don’t need to fumble around at the back or move it away from the wall every few cups of coffee you make. It’s a nice touch, especially as the water tank in particular requires regular topping up: every time you switch the machine on, it flushes water through its pipes to keep them clean. It’s a bit of a faff, but it has its benefits: the NC-ZA1 makes a surprisingly delicious cup of coffee.
Jura Capresso was born in 1994 as a company that aimed to deliver high-end European style coffeemakers to the American market. Eight years later, it entered into a joint venture agreement with Jura AG, a Swiss developer and distributor of automatic coffee centers that is present in more than 50 countries. By 2008, Jura AG had become the sole owner of all Jura Capresso operations.
The ENO Micro is one of the latest offerings from Jura that signals their move toward more compact units that consume less real estate in the kitchen. In fact, this particular unit is actually shorter than the older compact ENA line by a few inches. We love its small size and low profile, and find that its unassuming presence adds to the impact when the coffee start being made. Some users actually prefer the larger Jura units, but we prefer the Micro 9’s size and simplicity. The Jura ENA Micro 9 is the world’s smallest one-touch cappuccino maker but that certainly does not mean that they skimped on features or design elements.
Aside from the display, another feature of the Jura Impressa F8 that is worth mentioning is the Expert Mode. As the name suggests, this feature is ideal for coffee connoisseurs as it allows changing or adjusting the settings for all drinks programmed on the machine. It also gives users the option of adjusting the volume of the shot once it starts to brew.
And it bears out in the coffee the machine produces: our very first cup was a delicious and gloriously smooth latte with barely a hint of bitterness. The milk steaming wand is excellent too, producing much lighter, airier foam than the (admittedly way, way cheaper) Morphy Richards’ model, and there’s also a hot water spout for those who want to make an Americano by topping up their espresso.
Using the machine the first time was fun - it has lights that shine down on the cup for a very cool look. It is much quieter than our DeLonghi, and very fast to heat up and grind, brew, and dispense the coffee. The crema is very nice, and the coffee tastes great. The drip tray is easy to pull out to the front, and easy to rinse and throw away the grinds. The machine is plastic, which is ok, but the tray where the cup rests is polished silver metal, and has a nice heaviness to it. The J9.3 comes with a Jura milk container and tubes. We don't do a lot of milk drinks, so I didn't mind that you have to do just a bit extra to fill up the container and attach the hose. You could just put a hose into a cup of milk; you don't have to use the Jura container. It made a very nice latte, great foam. It was actually easy to clean and rinse, but you do have to take the time to be there with two cups - one with rinse water and another to catch the dirty water, then repeat. If you don't mind taking a couple extra steps and minutes, then it's easy. The J9.3 came with the Jura milk container.
The shining feature of the Jura is just how freshly the coffee is before its brewed. With conventional drip coffee makers, you load it with pre-ground coffee that has a good chance of already being somewhat stale. After all, ground coffee starts to go downhill quickly after being ground. Slightly more expensive drip coffee makers try to solve this problem by allowing you to set a timer to grind the coffee fresh every morning, but it’s still going to sit there for some length of time before it gets brewed. The Jura coffee machine has cracked the code by grinding beans fresh for every single cup of coffee, espresso, cappuccino or latte. It doesn’t grind it until you are about to drink it, which gives you a fresher cup of coffee than most coffee shops will be able to provide. Not having to grind the coffee yourself and then clean the grinder is on it’s own and huge step in the direction of convenience.
You can also make milky or foamed coffees, thanks to a tube that can be placed in a milk jug (or Panasonic’s own optional “Milktank” accessory). Or just have the machine squirt out hot water for tea-making. You can also tweak the amount of coffee, water and milk, and the temperature before a drink is made, and save up to four of these combinations on the machine as personal favourites.
This machine makes the best coffee I've ever had! No more high priced Starbucks! This is quality coffee/espresso for a fraction of what he cost! Let's do the math......a caffe latte = $4.25 from Starbucks. Let's say you buy one everyday on your way to work. That's 250 lattes a year@ 4.25= Approximately $1100 a year!! Buy an all in one Jura capresso machine and it pays for its self in less than a year! These very well built and made to last! My wife and I absolutely love this machine! This machine is over a decade old and still works like brand new! Add beans water and out comes the best cup of java you will ever have!

This super-automatic Jura Capresso ENA 5 coffee machine does produce a tasty cup of coffee, no doubt about it. But we are concerned about its ability to hold up under pressure (literally, with flying milk nozzles!). For the kind of cash that this machine requires, most customers would likely be happier with another Jura model (the S9, perhaps) or another brand of super-automatic coffee machine.
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